Monday, November 05, 2018

Voting

Cognitive dissonance (holding two opposing ideas at the same time) is supposed to be stressful. Perhaps and perhaps not.

"Every vote counts" is uttered and repeated an uncountable number of times. But it is not true. At the margin, votes that count (in majoratorian situations) are the ones that tip the outcome. Such results are exceedingly rare to say the least. This means that the odds of my vote having any significance are almost zero.  When I tell my friends that I do not plan to vote tomorrow, most are incredulous. My simple explanations fall on deaf ears -- to be polite about it.

Go to a country that does not have a history of the popular vote and see people line up, often for hours, to cast their ballots. The thought that their integrity is respected to the point where they are invited to cast their vote thrills them. In that way, it thrills me too.

Trouble is that in our secular age, political action attracts those who need to believe and to join. The urge to say and do reprehensible things for "the team" is less than thrilling. 

Thursday, November 01, 2018

Philosophers and social scientists

Here is Russ Roberts writing about lonely men with guns. Do read the whole essay.
I don’t think it’s a coincidence that almost all of the acts of mass murder and terrorism are committed by men, mostly lonely men, disaffected, alienated from modern life, alienated from the standard of success our culture aspires to, disconnected from those around them. No one pays much attention to them until people are forced to pay attention at the point of gun. No one pays much attention until the headlines that scream that these lonely men have finally achieved something people are going to have to notice.
Roberts writes about people with no love in their life. This is the real inequality, not the one we hear about so much from politicians and pundits.

We encounter many of the broken as street people in our major cities. Having a loose bill in hand to give them is all I can think of.

Philosophers write about the human condition and often end up wringing their hands via a nihilistic theoretical conclusion.  Desperation and the absence of happiness have been themes at least since the thinkers in Athens BC.  John Gray offers a wonderful and concise tour of many more writers' thoughts -- even including the views of grand nihilist, Marquis de Sade. Many of these thinkers are themselves serious depressives.

Social scientists tend not to be depressives or philosophers and, instead, they dig for explanations (stories) that suggest a "fix". Many espouse "programs". In quotes because the word has become cringy.

But does anyone really know how to confiscate millions (hundreds of millions) of firearms? Does anyone know how to treat the alienation from modern life that Roberts mentions?  Honesty demands that they admit they do not know.  Roberts essay is a good place to start.

Here is Timothy Taylor on kinlessness. Again, no "program" in sight that would make a difference. Offer a hand to the broken people you encounter.